Viewing entries tagged
alabama women

Episode 2 - The Fight For Alabama's Last Wild Places

Ruth Manasco is an artist, teacher, conservationist and elder in the Blue Clan of the Echota Cherokee. She is the much loved heart of Dancing Rabbit Pottery studio. Ruth was part of the years-long efforts to have the Sipsey declared Wilderness in 1974, and was part of the movement to save the Bankhead National Forest in the 80’s and 90’s.

Ruth Manasco is an artist, teacher, conservationist and elder in the Blue Clan of the Echota Cherokee. She is the much loved heart of Dancing Rabbit Pottery studio. Ruth was part of the years-long efforts to have the Sipsey declared Wilderness in 1974, and was part of the movement to save the Bankhead National Forest in the 80’s and 90’s.

The Big Tree

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Women of the Sipsey

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BONUS Episode: The Grandmother Mountains

Janice Barrett of Wild South’s Alabama office introduces the context of the Present Tense Media series, “The Fight For Alabama’s Last Wild Places”.

Janice Barrett of Wild South and Present Tense Executive Producer Anne Markham Bailey in the Bankhead National Forest.

Janice Barrett of Wild South and Present Tense Executive Producer Anne Markham Bailey in the Bankhead National Forest.

Emerge Alabama: Voices of Progress #2

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In the second episode of the Emerge Alabama Voices of Progress series, we hear from Amy Wasyluka, running for Alabama State Senate District 2, Lindsey Deckard, running for State Senate District 16 and Dr. Stacie Propst, Executive Director of Emerge Alabama.  These are women who have committed to a vision of the future that is more just, equitable and inclusive. These women see governance as a way to serve and to shape a better Alabama, in which citizens are educated and valued, offered opportunities for economic and community empowerment, in which well-being is not a dream but is a premise of leadership. 

AMY WASYLUKA    I am running for Alabama State Senate District 2.    I am a half-deaf childhood cancer survivor appellate attorney from Madison, Alabama. I am married to Tim Wasyluka Jr., who is currently a JAG with the Alabama Army National Guard and who also works as a civilian contract attorney. We have a 3-year old daughter named Ruth Grace. I am also the adopted daughter of two life-long public school educators.    I earned my undergraduate degree at Auburn University where I developed a lifelong desire to serve my community which led me to go on to study law at the University Of Alabama School Of Law.    After graduating law school, I have worked in a variety of legal areas including family law, bankruptcy, civil litigation and appeals. My work as an attorney has given me the ability to serve the people of my community, has taught me how to work with parties on all sides of an issue, and has taught me that the quick and easy answer is very rarely the correct one. It also taught me the value of confronting the reality you have rather than the one you would like to have.    Too often we have seen elected officials who view politics not as a way to serve their communities, but as a team sport where political points matter more than the needs of their constituents.  Alabama deserves politicians who are willing to use commonsense to confront the realities and challenges before us. My background as an attorney a childhood cancer survivor and a mother gives me insights into many of the kitchen table issues so many Alabamians face and allows me to advocate for the needs of District 2 from a position of cooperation and compassion.       To learn more about my campaign you can visit my website at:  www.wasylukaforsenate.com . You can also check us out on social media at: @wasyluka4senate    

AMY WASYLUKA

I am running for Alabama State Senate District 2.

I am a half-deaf childhood cancer survivor appellate attorney from Madison, Alabama. I am married to Tim Wasyluka Jr., who is currently a JAG with the Alabama Army National Guard and who also works as a civilian contract attorney. We have a 3-year old daughter named Ruth Grace. I am also the adopted daughter of two life-long public school educators.

I earned my undergraduate degree at Auburn University where I developed a lifelong desire to serve my community which led me to go on to study law at the University Of Alabama School Of Law.

After graduating law school, I have worked in a variety of legal areas including family law, bankruptcy, civil litigation and appeals. My work as an attorney has given me the ability to serve the people of my community, has taught me how to work with parties on all sides of an issue, and has taught me that the quick and easy answer is very rarely the correct one. It also taught me the value of confronting the reality you have rather than the one you would like to have.

Too often we have seen elected officials who view politics not as a way to serve their communities, but as a team sport where political points matter more than the needs of their constituents.  Alabama deserves politicians who are willing to use commonsense to confront the realities and challenges before us. My background as an attorney a childhood cancer survivor and a mother gives me insights into many of the kitchen table issues so many Alabamians face and allows me to advocate for the needs of District 2 from a position of cooperation and compassion.  

To learn more about my campaign you can visit my website at: www.wasylukaforsenate.com. You can also check us out on social media at: @wasyluka4senate

 

LINDSEY DECKARD    Running for    Alabama Senate District 16    Originally from Ashtabula, Ohio, I’m the first of ten children.  We moved a lot when I was young; every step up the career ladder for my dad required our family to move to a new town, and often a new state.  While moving was a lot of work for my mom, we kids loved the adventure of being in new places and meeting new people.     Married in 1976, I am the proud mother of two beautiful people.  My daughter Elizabeth is a successful certified financial planner and my son Zackary is a plumber and a decorated Marine Corps veteran who served two tours of duty in the Iraq war.      I’ve lived in Alabama for 34 years; I moved here in 1984 because of a great job opportunity and have remained here because of work and good friends, and because I’ve become warmly attached to the beautiful State of Alabama.    I attended the University of South Florida and earned a B.S. degree in Microbiology in 1984.  I chose microbiology because it was complex and interesting and the course-work offered the kind of training that would lead to a good job and a career that could support my family.    My first professional job was with Southern Research Institute; I worked as a scientist and program manager at both SRI and UAB for 30 years.  Early in my career, it was my great privilege to work as a government contractor for the U.S. military; in later years my work focused on bio-medical research.  I was fortunate to have had an opportunity to make a number of contributions in the areas of national defense, environmental research and biomedical research.      Early on as a scientist I became proficient in running a business.  Most people don’t recognize that science is a business, but it is very much an entrepreneurial venture.  In order to be successful, a scientist not only needs to be skilled in producing a desirable scientific work-product, they must also be skilled in sales and marketing and in developing business proposals with ideas that will generate knowledge and that can solve various problems. And as with any business, scientists are as accountable to their clients as any other viable business in the marketplace.     

LINDSEY DECKARD

Running for Alabama Senate District 16

Originally from Ashtabula, Ohio, I’m the first of ten children.  We moved a lot when I was young; every step up the career ladder for my dad required our family to move to a new town, and often a new state.  While moving was a lot of work for my mom, we kids loved the adventure of being in new places and meeting new people.

 Married in 1976, I am the proud mother of two beautiful people.  My daughter Elizabeth is a successful certified financial planner and my son Zackary is a plumber and a decorated Marine Corps veteran who served two tours of duty in the Iraq war. 

 I’ve lived in Alabama for 34 years; I moved here in 1984 because of a great job opportunity and have remained here because of work and good friends, and because I’ve become warmly attached to the beautiful State of Alabama.

I attended the University of South Florida and earned a B.S. degree in Microbiology in 1984.  I chose microbiology because it was complex and interesting and the course-work offered the kind of training that would lead to a good job and a career that could support my family.

My first professional job was with Southern Research Institute; I worked as a scientist and program manager at both SRI and UAB for 30 years.  Early in my career, it was my great privilege to work as a government contractor for the U.S. military; in later years my work focused on bio-medical research.  I was fortunate to have had an opportunity to make a number of contributions in the areas of national defense, environmental research and biomedical research. 

Early on as a scientist I became proficient in running a business.  Most people don’t recognize that science is a business, but it is very much an entrepreneurial venture.  In order to be successful, a scientist not only needs to be skilled in producing a desirable scientific work-product, they must also be skilled in sales and marketing and in developing business proposals with ideas that will generate knowledge and that can solve various problems. And as with any business, scientists are as accountable to their clients as any other viable business in the marketplace.

 

DR. STACIE PROPST  An Alabama native, Dr. Stacie Propst is founding director of Emerge Alabama. The Emerge program inspires women to run for office and hones their skills to win. Our goal is clear: to increase the number of Democratic women serving in public office in Alabama. Her professional experience includes government relations, issue advocacy, nonprofit executive management, higher education, career development, and medical research. Dr. Propst graduated from New College at the University of Alabama and received her doctorate in physiology and biophysics from the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Her research areas focused on cancer and lung inflammation.  Contact Stacie: stacie@emergeal.com

DR. STACIE PROPST

An Alabama native, Dr. Stacie Propst is founding director of Emerge Alabama. The Emerge program inspires women to run for office and hones their skills to win. Our goal is clear: to increase the number of Democratic women serving in public office in Alabama.
Her professional experience includes government relations, issue advocacy,
nonprofit executive management, higher education, career development, and medical research.
Dr. Propst graduated from New College at the University of Alabama and received her doctorate in physiology and biophysics from the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Her research areas focused on cancer and lung inflammation.

Contact Stacie: stacie@emergeal.com

Emerge Alabama: Voices of Progress

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In this episode we hear from Cara McClure, who is running for Public Service Commission Place 1. She is a graduate of the first cohort of Emerge Alabama training. She speaks with Present Tense Podcast host Anne Markham Bailey about Emerge Alabama candidate training and support, her life as an activist and being a woman on an uneven playing field both in family life and in politics. Cara talks about the Alabama of the future that she is planning to shape.

 
Cara McClure, Candidate for Alabama Public Service Commission Place 1        The youngest of six siblings and the mother of one terrific son, Cara McClure was born and raised in Birmingham, Alabama in the great community of Powderly.     McClure’s entrepreneurial spirit was nurtured early by her parents and family. While in elementary school, she worked for the family’s cleaning service, where she made cold calls to apartment complexes and small businesses.  She also sold candy door-to-door and in school and also ran bus trips to Point Mallard without any adult support.    This early exposure to business shaped McClure and she sought out opportunities for personal development, learning marketing and recruiting. Eventually she moved into network marketing, building a team of more than 2000 brand new entrepreneurs across the United States and Canada.    McClure is a proponent of finding solutions to difficult circumstances. After spending time homeless following a marital separation, McClure turned personal hardship into opportunity when she created an apartment locating service to help individuals and families find their ideal homes.     McClure also supported the immigrant community by writing an open letter to the mayor and city council to make Birmingham a sanctuary city. McClure has been active with a number of social justice organizations including Stand as One, Faith in Action, Shut Down Etowah, Greater Birmingham Ministries, Adelante, Alabama Coalition for Immigrant Justice, Black Lives Matter, Indivisible Birmingham, and Arise.    McClure understands the importance of voter engagement, and holds voter registration and voter restoration events across the city.  Throughout her career, McClure has been a voice and advocate for the working poor, the homeless, and the forgotten and marginalized.     Through her personal philosophy of prayer, people, process, protest, policy,  polls and persistence, she helps those who live in the margins to build power and possibilities for a better life.

Cara McClure, Candidate for Alabama Public Service Commission Place 1

 The youngest of six siblings and the mother of one terrific son, Cara McClure was born and raised in Birmingham, Alabama in the great community of Powderly. 

McClure’s entrepreneurial spirit was nurtured early by her parents and family. While in elementary school, she worked for the family’s cleaning service, where she made cold calls to apartment complexes and small businesses.  She also sold candy door-to-door and in school and also ran bus trips to Point Mallard without any adult support.

This early exposure to business shaped McClure and she sought out opportunities for personal development, learning marketing and recruiting. Eventually she moved into network marketing, building a team of more than 2000 brand new entrepreneurs across the United States and Canada.

McClure is a proponent of finding solutions to difficult circumstances. After spending time homeless following a marital separation, McClure turned personal hardship into opportunity when she created an apartment locating service to help individuals and families find their ideal homes. 

McClure also supported the immigrant community by writing an open letter to the mayor and city council to make Birmingham a sanctuary city. McClure has been active with a number of social justice organizations including Stand as One, Faith in Action, Shut Down Etowah, Greater Birmingham Ministries, Adelante, Alabama Coalition for Immigrant Justice, Black Lives Matter, Indivisible Birmingham, and Arise.

McClure understands the importance of voter engagement, and holds voter registration and voter restoration events across the city.  Throughout her career, McClure has been a voice and advocate for the working poor, the homeless, and the forgotten and marginalized. 

Through her personal philosophy of prayer, people, process, protest, policy,  polls and persistence, she helps those who live in the margins to build power and possibilities for a better life.

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Episode 1: Disturb the Universe

Now on I-Tunes.

Now on I-Tunes.

DISTURB THE UNIVERSE

I wanted to tell my mother what had happened to me when I was a girl, when I was sexually abused and bullied in our home. I spent years imagining and rehearsing how I would do it. Decades passed. I didn't tell her because I didn't want to ruin her life. I wanted her to have an illusion of family life that had shattered for me when I was still a girl. I held my silence and lived out my trauma, diminished my shine.  Finally I started to tell her at a time that seemed ripe. I'd only said "When I was a girl," and she held up her hand and said she didn't want to know. So I never did tell her.

When #metoo began, I was happy. Yes, it happened to me. In all sorts of ways. I was assaulted. I was diminished. I was called "honey" in professional settings. I was undermined. But finally I would speak. And I would encourage other women to speak.

When Roy Moore of Alabama lied about his stalking and assault and the women who had the courage to come forward were doubted, I wanted to do something to stand up for all of us who do not come forward in a world that has not supported us but can.  The idea of the Authentic Voices Project emerged one day several weeks before the election, and I began to solicit stories. We asked Alabama women to tell their stories of sexual abuse, and then we went through the stories and plucked elements from each submission. From there we invited members of Sister City Connection Spoken Word Collective to record the selected segments. We delivered these recordings to Rynea Soul who worked her magic adding beats and weaving audio art.

 

We are not asking to be believed. The truth of our experience rises from within us. We do not look outside for validation. We settle into the fluency of our native tongue, before we were silent. From our abuse, we make audio art. We sound it out. We vibrate the chords that rise through our throats and we bring authentic voices into the world.

I was assaulted as a girl and I was bullied for decades. I was discriminated against because of my gender.  I trained myself to be tough as nails and this project is helping me to loosen up and feel my own story in the stories of others.

We are not asking for anyone to believe us.

We are telling our own truths.

If you have a story to tell, we want to hear from you. Please reach out to us at info@greenbucketpress.com. You can send your story as a text file or as an audio link.

If you have an ongoing sexual assault situation or want to seek counseling, please seek help.  In Birmingham,  https://crisiscenterbham.org/  Nationally: RAINN can route you to a regional assistance for sexual abuse.  https://www.rainn.org/