Episode 2 | Ruth Manasco | The Fight For Alabama's Last Wild Places

Ruth Manasco is an artist, teacher, conservationist and elder in the Blue Clan of the Echota Cherokee. She is the much loved heart of Dancing Rabbit Pottery studio. Ruth was part of the years-long efforts to have the Sipsey declared Wilderness in 1974, and was part of the movement to save the Bankhead National Forest in the 80’s and 90’s.

Ruth Manasco is an artist, teacher, conservationist and elder in the Blue Clan of the Echota Cherokee. She is the much loved heart of Dancing Rabbit Pottery studio. Ruth was part of the years-long efforts to have the Sipsey declared Wilderness in 1974, and was part of the movement to save the Bankhead National Forest in the 80’s and 90’s.

The Big Tree

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Women of the Sipsey

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BONUS Episode: The Grandmother Mountains

Janice Barrett of Wild South’s Alabama office introduces the context of the Present Tense Media series, “The Fight For Alabama’s Last Wild Places”.

Janice Barrett of Wild South and Present Tense Executive Producer Anne Markham Bailey in the Bankhead National Forest.

Janice Barrett of Wild South and Present Tense Executive Producer Anne Markham Bailey in the Bankhead National Forest.

Episode 1 | Lamar Marshall | The Fight For Alabama's Last Wild Places

Anne Markham Bailey, producer and host of Present Tense is joined by Janice Barrett of Wild South, in interviews with 13 of the key warriors who joined together to form a movement to stop the toxic management practices of the US Forest Service that were prevalent through the early 1990’s in the Bankhead National Forest. We hear how each of the warriors played a key role in the process of changing hearts and minds, including grassroots resistance and spiritual practice. Each interview is an episode. We’ll release several per week over a four week period.

Episode One features Lamar Marshall, citizen eco-warrior, founder of the Bankhead Monitor and Wild Alabama that became Wild South. Lamar mapped over 200 miles of the Trail Of Tears across Alabama and has been in the process of mapping Cherokee trails across the Carolinas.

Lamar Marshall and Present Tense Producer Anne Markham Bailey in the Moulton office of Wild South, in Lawrence County, Alabama. Lamar browses an early edition of the Bankhead Monitor.

Lamar Marshall and Present Tense Producer Anne Markham Bailey in the Moulton office of Wild South, in Lawrence County, Alabama. Lamar browses an early edition of the Bankhead Monitor.

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Janice Barrett, Alabama Outreach and Education Coordinator for Wild South, offers the historic context for The Fight For Alabama’s Last Wild Places series. Janice first volunteered as an artist and writer at the Bankhead Monitor in 1992, continuing when it became Wild Alabama in 1994, and Wild South in 2004. 

EPISODES

Lamar Marshall/Butch Walker/Ruth Manasco/Charles Borden/Bob Crow/Chief Grey Fox/Greg Preston/Charles Siefried/Vince Meleski/Larry Smith/Janice Barrett/Rob Cox/Terra Manasco/The Power of the Wild

ABOUT THE WHITE HORSE SINGERS

They attended and performed at the Declaration of Wilderness Areas for the Sipsey River and the Dugger Mountain ceremonies. Says Faron Weeks of the White Horse Singers, “A memory of note, while we were playing a prayer song at the Dugger Mountain ceremony a Red Tail Hawk flew over our drum.  It was a good day.” They currently host pow wows in Alabama and Tenneessee and  will be at the Oakville Indian Mounds in Lawrence County, Alabama on the 3rd weekend of May.

CREDITS

Present Tense Theme Music by Cellist and Composer Craig Hultgren.

Episode Music by The White Horse Singers, a southern style American Indian Drum group.

Thanks to Janice Barrett of Wild South Mouton Office for her endless support in the recording of this series.






The Fight For Alabama's Last Wild Places - Trailer 2

Featuring Terra Manasco, Greg Preston, Dr. Charles Borden and Chief Grey Fox

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Launches on Earth Day April 22, 2019

Listen to the voices of the citizen eco-warriors who formed a movement to save Alabama’s last wild places.

The Fight For Alabama's Last Wild Places - Trailer 1

This new series trailer features Lamar Marshall, Ruth Manasco, Butch Walker and Bob Crow.

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Listen to the stories of the citizen eco-warriors who created a movement to save Alabama’s last wild place.

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Poet Erica Dawson Speaks!

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About Erica Dawson

Erica is the author of two collections of poetry: The Small Blades Hurt (Measure Press, 2014), winner of the 2016 Poets’ Prize, and Big-Eyed Afraid (Waywiser Press, 2007), winner of the 2006 Anthony Hecht Prize. Her poems have appeared in Barrow Street, Birmingham Poetry Review, Blackbird, Literary Imagination, Unsplendid, Virginia Quarterly Review, and other journals. Her poems have been featured in several anthologies, including Best American Poetry 2008, 2012, and 2015, American Society: What Poets See; Living in Storms: Contemporary Poetry and the Moods of Manic-Depression; and The Swallow Anthology of New American Poets.    

Erica’s third book, When Rap Spoke Straight to God, will be published by Tin House Books in Fall 2018.

Born and raised in Maryland, Erica holds a BA from Johns Hopkins University, an  MFA from Ohio State University, and a PhD from University of Cincinnati.  She’s taught workshops and seminars at the Florida Arts Coalition’s Other Words Conference, St. Leo University’s Sandhill Writers Retreat, and the DISQUIET International Literary Program in Lisbon.  Erica is the Director of The University of Tampa’s Low-Residency MFA in Creative Writing, and, at UT, an associate professor of English and Writing.

She lives in Tampa with her Shih-Tzu, Stella, whom she named after Sir Philip Sidney’s Astrophil and Stella, not  Tennessee Williams’ Stella or Stella Artois, though Erica really likes Tennessee Williams and Stella Artois.

The Voices of High School Writers: 2018 UAB Ada Long Creative Writing Workshop

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In this Pre-Season 2 episode, we hear from the writers of the 2018 Ada Long Creative Writing Workshop.

The Ada Long Creative Writing Workshop is a 3-week workshop that offers a rare opportunity for high school students to learn from published authors. Every day, students will work closely with nationally acclaimed novelists, essayists, and poets, all of whom have extensive teaching experience. The Workshop is sponsored by the UAB English Department. The Workshop is named in honor of Dr. Ada Long, founding director of the UAB Honors Program, Professor of English, and lifelong advocate for community outreach, the value of a liberal education, and the enduring significance of literature.

The workshop is designed for high school students interested in creative writing for personal enrichment, as preparation for university work in creative writing, and as an introduction to creative writing as a career field.

The writers sat down with Anne Markham Bailey to talk about writing, to explore their lives as writers, why they write, what challenges they face, what they are reading and their plans for the future.

Thanks to the students:

Anna Grace Dasher

Ben Lasseter

Donna Aldeeb

David Hester IV

J. Hosier

Surina Prabhu

Hannah Bray

Tiffany Duong

Madison Prim

Y'onna Hale 

Jamiah Stroud

Dahlia Henderson

Elyie Brooke Basselin

Eleanor Roth

Samantha Walker

(Full disclosure, Green Bucket Press produces custom stickers and journals for the Ada Long Creative Writing Workshop, pictured here)

Conversation With Yasmeen Khan, Senior Rare Book Conservator

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NOTES ON THE EPISODE

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Hakīm (alternative transcription Hakeem) indicates a "wise man" or "physician", or in general, a practitioner of herbal medicine, especially of Unani and Islamic medicine (via Wikipedia)

Mullah: a Muslim learned in Islamic theology and sacred law.

Naqchbandi: a major Sunni spiritual order of Sufism. It got its name from Baha-ud-Din Naqshband Bukhari and traces its spiritual lineage to the Islamic prophet Muhammad, through Abu Bakr, who his father-in-law , a companion and successor of Muhammad. Some Naqshbandi masters trace their lineage through Ali,[1] his son-in-law and successor, in keeping with most other Sufis.[2][3]

Gaddi Nasheen The Gaddi looks after the shrine and carries out significant rituals

Maulvi (Mawlawi) is an honorific Islamic religious title given to Muslim religious scholars or Ulema preceding their names, similar to the titles MaulanaMullah, or Shaykh. Mawlawi generally means highly qualified Islamic scholar.

Dera Ismail Khan: British Cantonment town in KPK Province of Pakistan

Dera Ismail Khan: British Cantonment town in KPK Province of Pakistan

ABOUT YASMEEN KHAN & THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

https://blogs.loc.gov/law/2011/12/an-interview-with-yasmeen-khan-senior-rare-book-conservator-at-the-library-of-congress/

https://www.loc.gov/

https://www.loc.gov/collections/

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2018/05/toolkit-rare-book-conservation-library-of-congress/

ABOUT BOOK & MANUSCRIPT PRESERVATION & CONSERVATION

https://academicmatters.ca/2017/03/books-ready-dustbin-history/

https://www.loc.gov/preservation/about/history/pres-hist.pdf

Rita Feldman's Journey

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RITA FELDMAN

I was born in the beautiful very modern, though very ancient, 2000 years old city, named Tashkent. It is the capital of Uzbekistan, back then a part of the Soviet Union, now it is an independent country in the Middle Asia. In 1993 my family had to leave our homeland because of the etnic problems that not-native, not-Uzbek people started to face in Uzbekistan. We emigrated to America, and we were recognized as a political refugees. The organizations that helped us to move choose the city of Birmingham Al as a place where we were suppose to build our life almost from the sketch. It was hard,very hard, but eventually we did it, though we are still working on it. 🙂. I have many professions, starting with a chemical engineering, computer programming,  tour guiding, but all my life I was attracted to working with the people, their outer, and inner conditions and states. That's why for my professional life in America I chose to work as a skin care specialist,  massage therapist, and also I do energy healing - I am a Reiki Master, I do Past life regressions, and I facilitate Family Systemic Constellations - powerful therapy that is dealing with a history of people's families, and how it influence our current lives. I have my own business called "Rita’s Touch" since 1998, and this year we are going to celebrate 20 years of it's successful service to the people of Birmingham. 
 

Rita and her mother Genia

Rita and her mother Genia

Rita and her son Maksim.

Rita and her son Maksim.

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Emerge Alabama: Voices of Progress #2

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In the second episode of the Emerge Alabama Voices of Progress series, we hear from Amy Wasyluka, running for Alabama State Senate District 2, Lindsey Deckard, running for State Senate District 16 and Dr. Stacie Propst, Executive Director of Emerge Alabama.  These are women who have committed to a vision of the future that is more just, equitable and inclusive. These women see governance as a way to serve and to shape a better Alabama, in which citizens are educated and valued, offered opportunities for economic and community empowerment, in which well-being is not a dream but is a premise of leadership. 

AMY WASYLUKA    I am running for Alabama State Senate District 2.    I am a half-deaf childhood cancer survivor appellate attorney from Madison, Alabama. I am married to Tim Wasyluka Jr., who is currently a JAG with the Alabama Army National Guard and who also works as a civilian contract attorney. We have a 3-year old daughter named Ruth Grace. I am also the adopted daughter of two life-long public school educators.    I earned my undergraduate degree at Auburn University where I developed a lifelong desire to serve my community which led me to go on to study law at the University Of Alabama School Of Law.    After graduating law school, I have worked in a variety of legal areas including family law, bankruptcy, civil litigation and appeals. My work as an attorney has given me the ability to serve the people of my community, has taught me how to work with parties on all sides of an issue, and has taught me that the quick and easy answer is very rarely the correct one. It also taught me the value of confronting the reality you have rather than the one you would like to have.    Too often we have seen elected officials who view politics not as a way to serve their communities, but as a team sport where political points matter more than the needs of their constituents.  Alabama deserves politicians who are willing to use commonsense to confront the realities and challenges before us. My background as an attorney a childhood cancer survivor and a mother gives me insights into many of the kitchen table issues so many Alabamians face and allows me to advocate for the needs of District 2 from a position of cooperation and compassion.       To learn more about my campaign you can visit my website at:  www.wasylukaforsenate.com . You can also check us out on social media at: @wasyluka4senate    

AMY WASYLUKA

I am running for Alabama State Senate District 2.

I am a half-deaf childhood cancer survivor appellate attorney from Madison, Alabama. I am married to Tim Wasyluka Jr., who is currently a JAG with the Alabama Army National Guard and who also works as a civilian contract attorney. We have a 3-year old daughter named Ruth Grace. I am also the adopted daughter of two life-long public school educators.

I earned my undergraduate degree at Auburn University where I developed a lifelong desire to serve my community which led me to go on to study law at the University Of Alabama School Of Law.

After graduating law school, I have worked in a variety of legal areas including family law, bankruptcy, civil litigation and appeals. My work as an attorney has given me the ability to serve the people of my community, has taught me how to work with parties on all sides of an issue, and has taught me that the quick and easy answer is very rarely the correct one. It also taught me the value of confronting the reality you have rather than the one you would like to have.

Too often we have seen elected officials who view politics not as a way to serve their communities, but as a team sport where political points matter more than the needs of their constituents.  Alabama deserves politicians who are willing to use commonsense to confront the realities and challenges before us. My background as an attorney a childhood cancer survivor and a mother gives me insights into many of the kitchen table issues so many Alabamians face and allows me to advocate for the needs of District 2 from a position of cooperation and compassion.  

To learn more about my campaign you can visit my website at: www.wasylukaforsenate.com. You can also check us out on social media at: @wasyluka4senate

 

LINDSEY DECKARD    Running for    Alabama Senate District 16    Originally from Ashtabula, Ohio, I’m the first of ten children.  We moved a lot when I was young; every step up the career ladder for my dad required our family to move to a new town, and often a new state.  While moving was a lot of work for my mom, we kids loved the adventure of being in new places and meeting new people.     Married in 1976, I am the proud mother of two beautiful people.  My daughter Elizabeth is a successful certified financial planner and my son Zackary is a plumber and a decorated Marine Corps veteran who served two tours of duty in the Iraq war.      I’ve lived in Alabama for 34 years; I moved here in 1984 because of a great job opportunity and have remained here because of work and good friends, and because I’ve become warmly attached to the beautiful State of Alabama.    I attended the University of South Florida and earned a B.S. degree in Microbiology in 1984.  I chose microbiology because it was complex and interesting and the course-work offered the kind of training that would lead to a good job and a career that could support my family.    My first professional job was with Southern Research Institute; I worked as a scientist and program manager at both SRI and UAB for 30 years.  Early in my career, it was my great privilege to work as a government contractor for the U.S. military; in later years my work focused on bio-medical research.  I was fortunate to have had an opportunity to make a number of contributions in the areas of national defense, environmental research and biomedical research.      Early on as a scientist I became proficient in running a business.  Most people don’t recognize that science is a business, but it is very much an entrepreneurial venture.  In order to be successful, a scientist not only needs to be skilled in producing a desirable scientific work-product, they must also be skilled in sales and marketing and in developing business proposals with ideas that will generate knowledge and that can solve various problems. And as with any business, scientists are as accountable to their clients as any other viable business in the marketplace.     

LINDSEY DECKARD

Running for Alabama Senate District 16

Originally from Ashtabula, Ohio, I’m the first of ten children.  We moved a lot when I was young; every step up the career ladder for my dad required our family to move to a new town, and often a new state.  While moving was a lot of work for my mom, we kids loved the adventure of being in new places and meeting new people.

 Married in 1976, I am the proud mother of two beautiful people.  My daughter Elizabeth is a successful certified financial planner and my son Zackary is a plumber and a decorated Marine Corps veteran who served two tours of duty in the Iraq war. 

 I’ve lived in Alabama for 34 years; I moved here in 1984 because of a great job opportunity and have remained here because of work and good friends, and because I’ve become warmly attached to the beautiful State of Alabama.

I attended the University of South Florida and earned a B.S. degree in Microbiology in 1984.  I chose microbiology because it was complex and interesting and the course-work offered the kind of training that would lead to a good job and a career that could support my family.

My first professional job was with Southern Research Institute; I worked as a scientist and program manager at both SRI and UAB for 30 years.  Early in my career, it was my great privilege to work as a government contractor for the U.S. military; in later years my work focused on bio-medical research.  I was fortunate to have had an opportunity to make a number of contributions in the areas of national defense, environmental research and biomedical research. 

Early on as a scientist I became proficient in running a business.  Most people don’t recognize that science is a business, but it is very much an entrepreneurial venture.  In order to be successful, a scientist not only needs to be skilled in producing a desirable scientific work-product, they must also be skilled in sales and marketing and in developing business proposals with ideas that will generate knowledge and that can solve various problems. And as with any business, scientists are as accountable to their clients as any other viable business in the marketplace.

 

DR. STACIE PROPST  An Alabama native, Dr. Stacie Propst is founding director of Emerge Alabama. The Emerge program inspires women to run for office and hones their skills to win. Our goal is clear: to increase the number of Democratic women serving in public office in Alabama. Her professional experience includes government relations, issue advocacy, nonprofit executive management, higher education, career development, and medical research. Dr. Propst graduated from New College at the University of Alabama and received her doctorate in physiology and biophysics from the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Her research areas focused on cancer and lung inflammation.  Contact Stacie: stacie@emergeal.com

DR. STACIE PROPST

An Alabama native, Dr. Stacie Propst is founding director of Emerge Alabama. The Emerge program inspires women to run for office and hones their skills to win. Our goal is clear: to increase the number of Democratic women serving in public office in Alabama.
Her professional experience includes government relations, issue advocacy,
nonprofit executive management, higher education, career development, and medical research.
Dr. Propst graduated from New College at the University of Alabama and received her doctorate in physiology and biophysics from the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Her research areas focused on cancer and lung inflammation.

Contact Stacie: stacie@emergeal.com